Columns of the Temple of Luxor decorations.

Ancient Egyptian ornaments. Columns decoration. Papyrus Plants, Lotus ornaments. Temple of Luxor, Thebes.

Plate VI.

Ancient Egyptian ornaments. Columns decoration. Papyrus Plants, Lotus ornaments. Temple of Luxor.

Plate VI.

Columns of the Temple of Luxor. Ancient Egyptian Ornaments and Decorations.

PLATE VI.

1. Capital of the large Columns of the Temple of Luxor, Thebes, of the time of Amunoph III., 1250 B.C., according to Sharpe. It represents the full-blown Papyrus, and around it Papyri and Lotus Buds alternating.
2. Capital of the smaller Columns of the Memnonium, Thebes, B.C. 1200. Represents a single Bud of the Papyrus decorated with the coloured pendent Fasciae that are seen in the painted representations of Columns of Plate IV. Nos. 5, 6, 12.
3. Capital of the smaller Columns of the Temple of Luxor, B.C. 1250. Representing eight Buds of the Papyrus bound together, and adorned with pendent and coloured Fasciae.
4. Capital from a Temple in the Oasis of Thebes. Representing a collection of Aquatic Plants, with triangular Stalks tied round a single full-blown Papyrus.
5. Capital from the Portico of Edfu, B.C. 145, of similar structure to No. 4.
6. Capital from the principal Temple in the Island of Phila?, B.C. 106. The full-blown Papyrus surrounded by the same flower in various stages of growth.
7. Capital from a Temple in the Oasis of Thebes.
8. Capital from the Colonnade of the Island of Philae. Representing sixteen Lotus Flowers bound together in three tiers. Shown in elevation.
9. The Capital No. 8 seen in Perspective.
10. Capital from a Temple in the Oasis of Thebes. Representing eight Lotus Flowers bound together in two tiers.
11. Capital from the unfinished hypaethral Temple in the Island of Philae. Roman period, B.C. 140. Composed of the Papyrus Plant in three stages of growth, and arranged in three tiers: the first composed of four full-blown and four large expanding the second tier, of eight smaller expanding flowers; and the third tier, of sixteen buds : making in all a bundle of thirty-two plants. The stem of each plant may be traced, by the size and colour of its stalk, down to the horizontal bands or fasciae. See Plate IV. Nos. 5, 6, 12.
12. Capital from the Temple at Koom-Ombos. The full-grown Papyrus surrounded by various flowers.
13. Capital from the principal Temple, Philae. Representing two tiers of the Papyrus, in three stages of growth. The first tier composed of eight plants, four full-blown and four expanding; the second tier composed of eight buds: making sixteen plants. In this capital the circular form is not disturbed as in No. 11.
14. Capital from the unfinished hypaethral Temple, Philae. Composed of three tiers of the Papyrus Plant, in three stages of growth. The first tier has eight full-blown and eight expanding plants; the second tier, sixteen expanding flowers ; and the third tier, thirty two buds of the Papyrus: in all, sixty-four plants. The stem of each plant is distinguished by its size and colour, and continued down to the horizontal band’s which bind them together round the shaft.
15. Capital from the unfinished hypaethral Temple, Philae. Composed of the Papyrus in two stages of growth, arranged in three tiers. The first composed of four full-blown and four expanding flowers; the second tier, of eight smaller, full-blown ; and the third tier, of sixteen, still smaller.
16. Capital from the Portico of Edfu, b.c. 145. Represents the Palm-tree, with nine branches, or faces. The horizontal fasciae of the Palm-tree Capital differ from the fasciae of all the other capitals, inasmuch as there is always a pendent loop.
17. Capital of the Greco-Egyptian form, but of the Roman period. Very remarkable, as showing the Egyptian and Greek elements combined, viz. the Papyrus in two stages of growth, with the Acanthus leaf and the tendrils of the Honeysuckle.

Source: The grammar of ornament by Owen Jones, London 1910

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